tomwilson

12 Jul 2017 65 views
 
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photoblog image Whaling Pot

Whaling Pot

 

In the Museum of Iron, Coalbrookdale. According to the information on the stand in front of the pot:

 

'Abraham Darby came to Coalbrookdale in 1708 to make cast iron pots. The same type of pots remained in production into the early 1900s and had many names such as 'furnaces', 'hoddy-doddies' and 'missionary pots'.

 

They were produced in a range of sizes up to 400 gallons and were used in large kitchens and in inudstrial processes such as soap-making.

 

Pots like this one, with flattened sides, were used by whalers for rendering down whale blubber. This released the valuable oil it contained. The pots were used either on board ship, or landed ashore, and examples have been found as far away as Tasmania and the Hawaiian Islands.'

 

En route back to the UK today - comment, etc. uncertain.

Whaling Pot

 

In the Museum of Iron, Coalbrookdale. According to the information on the stand in front of the pot:

 

'Abraham Darby came to Coalbrookdale in 1708 to make cast iron pots. The same type of pots remained in production into the early 1900s and had many names such as 'furnaces', 'hoddy-doddies' and 'missionary pots'.

 

They were produced in a range of sizes up to 400 gallons and were used in large kitchens and in inudstrial processes such as soap-making.

 

Pots like this one, with flattened sides, were used by whalers for rendering down whale blubber. This released the valuable oil it contained. The pots were used either on board ship, or landed ashore, and examples have been found as far away as Tasmania and the Hawaiian Islands.'

 

En route back to the UK today - comment, etc. uncertain.

comments (10)

Missionary pots--I love it...
  • Ray
  • Not in United States
  • 12 Jul 2017, 01:19
Highly functional, Tom, but also possessing a rugged beauty.

I suppose the Tasmanian cannibals used them for boiling up the missionaries that they caught? smile
I imagine this thing weighs a ton!
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 12 Jul 2017, 06:25
Rendering whale blubber - what a living!
That's a lot of "education" in one post, Tom!
  • Lisl
  • Bath, England
  • 12 Jul 2017, 06:40
I imagine this is very very big, Tom
there's got to be an explanation how the name hoddy-dodd came up and associated with this, Tom!
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 12 Jul 2017, 07:08
It must be very robust then Tom.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 12 Jul 2017, 10:33
The three-legged pot is still for sale in most of our supermarkets. Afrikaans people has a tradition around 'potjiekos' that will translate to pot food. The styles of dishes range anything from a stew (meat at the bottom, veggies on top and don't stir until ready to serve), pot roasts (my favourite is leg of warthog gently cooked in cherry brandy), paella like seafood dishes, curries, breads and many more. Most of the black peoples will use it to make 'pap', a stiff porridge from rough maize meal, allowing a crust to form against the pot's inner sides, adding a brilliant lightly burned taste. The pap is staple.

The shape of the pot distributes the heat very well, while the concave lid does a lot to preserve flavours.
Why was the side straight?

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