tomwilson

14 Jul 2017 54 views
 
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photoblog image The Eagle Slayer

The Eagle Slayer

"The Eagle Slayer was cast in iron by the Coalbrookdale Company for the Great Exhibition of 1851. It was designed by the popular Victorian, neo-classical sculptor, John Bell (1811-95) and is representative of the art castings in iron or bronze begun by the company in the late 1830s.

 

The subject - of a shepherd boy shooting down an eagle - was inspired by one of Aesop's fables in which an eagle has just killed a lamb in the young shepherd's flock. The boy exacts his revenge by shooting down the bird with an arrow which uses a loose feather dropped by the eagle.  Unwillingly, therefore, goes the fable, we give our enemies the means of our own destruction.

 

Following the Great Exhibition, the statue is believed to have been donated to the precursor of the Victoria and Albert Museum in South Kensington.  In 1927 it was transferred to the Bethnal Green Museum and returned to Coalbrookdale for the first time, on loan from the V&A Museum of Childhood." 

 

The Museum of Iron is a good deal more interesting than its name might suggest :-)

The Eagle Slayer

"The Eagle Slayer was cast in iron by the Coalbrookdale Company for the Great Exhibition of 1851. It was designed by the popular Victorian, neo-classical sculptor, John Bell (1811-95) and is representative of the art castings in iron or bronze begun by the company in the late 1830s.

 

The subject - of a shepherd boy shooting down an eagle - was inspired by one of Aesop's fables in which an eagle has just killed a lamb in the young shepherd's flock. The boy exacts his revenge by shooting down the bird with an arrow which uses a loose feather dropped by the eagle.  Unwillingly, therefore, goes the fable, we give our enemies the means of our own destruction.

 

Following the Great Exhibition, the statue is believed to have been donated to the precursor of the Victoria and Albert Museum in South Kensington.  In 1927 it was transferred to the Bethnal Green Museum and returned to Coalbrookdale for the first time, on loan from the V&A Museum of Childhood." 

 

The Museum of Iron is a good deal more interesting than its name might suggest :-)

comments (8)

I wouldn't have expected such artwork in an iron museum! Very nice!
Tom Wilson: Nor me!
  • Ray
  • Not in United States
  • 14 Jul 2017, 06:50
It has very graceful lines, Tom. Who would have thought Iron...
Tom Wilson: Quite astonishing what they did with the 'new' processes.
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 14 Jul 2017, 06:57
High Victorian art Tom, although the theme might today be politically incorrect
Tom Wilson: Eagle conservationists would be rightly incensed smile
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 14 Jul 2017, 07:27
That's all very well Tom, but if he misses the eagle he had better take cover.
Tom Wilson: You'll see that the arrow has gone, Chad and, according to the story, he was successful smile
Another very good sculpture.
Tom Wilson: John Bell was quite the master!
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 14 Jul 2017, 19:04
His arrow must still be on it's way, but already the lamb and feather are at his feet. Lovely sculpture, all the same.
Tom Wilson: It's called artistic licence smile I agree, quite lovely.
In true Victorian style decency is preserved so as not to shock the ladies
I like museums for their education and would love one devoted to iron.

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