tomwilson

05 Jul 2018 36 views
 
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photoblog image Knossos - Bull leaping

Knossos - Bull leaping

 

The remains of the most famous of the Knossos frescoes - the bull-leaping fresco.  We were told that the figure in the centre, with the red body is a man - this colour through working outdoors, while the two white figures are women.  The official guide says nothing to this effect, but suggests that the figure shows the three stages of the leap.  The Wikipedia article, however, does support the guide's account.  There's a colourful reproduction on Getty Images.

Knossos - Bull leaping

 

The remains of the most famous of the Knossos frescoes - the bull-leaping fresco.  We were told that the figure in the centre, with the red body is a man - this colour through working outdoors, while the two white figures are women.  The official guide says nothing to this effect, but suggests that the figure shows the three stages of the leap.  The Wikipedia article, however, does support the guide's account.  There's a colourful reproduction on Getty Images.

comments (9)

This is very nice, Tom.
Tom Wilson: One can see the logic of the reconstruction.
C'est très joli et original.
Tom Wilson: C'est vrai, Martine.
That's just incredible!
Tom Wilson: Yes, human beings seem to be predisposed to create art.
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 5 Jul 2018, 06:20
A fascinating image Tom, Getty seems to suggest ritual..
Tom Wilson: Yes, no one really knows what went on... there are all kinds of suggestions.
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 5 Jul 2018, 07:37
When I was young I used to think that our human intelligence had grown over the centuries,
. This idea was probably reinforced by the ancient people, bashing bits of stone together and living in caves etc. Now, through art it is clear that we have not developed that quickly but, the secret of development seems to be, in my opinion, down to tooling. This is a long development time to get from a piece of flint to an electron microscope.
Tom Wilson: I think you are right, Chad - the key point seems to have been when we switched from hunter-gathering to farming, when more tools were needed. I don't think we are much brighter, if any, than ancient homo sapiens and the Neanderthals had bigger brains! However, ideas on neuro-plasticity suggest that practice of anything results in changes in the brain - like the London taxi drivers whose posterior hippocampus increased in size as a result of "doing the Knowledge".
Good lighting for it.
Tom Wilson: The museum was very well lit for the objects.
It is very well preserved, and the Getty link puts it all into perspective.
Tom Wilson: Yes, enough was preserved to enable the restorers to figure out the whole design.
Chad's comment and you reply are very interesting Tom. I guess the next big change was from farming to industrial and the move into cities and then the computer age. The pace of change is accelerating but we are no brighter and I doubt any more civilised
Tom Wilson: I think you are right on all counts, Bill smile
  • sherri
  • Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
  • 6 Jul 2018, 03:19
it's quite beautiful

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camera DMC-TZ70
exposure mode shutter priority
shutterspeed 1/40s
aperture f/3.3
sensitivity ISO400
focal length 4.3mm
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