tomwilson

13 Nov 2015 131 views
 
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photoblog image Miss Hussey

Miss Hussey

 

The young Miss Hussey of the Hussey Delaval family who later became Countess of Tyrconnel.  We were told that her behaviour was so outrageous that the word "hussey" to describe such a woman was the result of her notoriety.  Unfortunately, the Oxford English Dictionary disagrees, noting the first use of the word in 1505 and its derivation from the Anglo Saxon "huswife".  It makes a nice story to tell the visitors, however.  The portrait is in the gallery of the West wing of the house, which was re-occupied by the family (then Lord and Lady Hastings) in the 1950s.  The present Lord Hastings subsequently sold the property to the National Trust.

Miss Hussey

 

The young Miss Hussey of the Hussey Delaval family who later became Countess of Tyrconnel.  We were told that her behaviour was so outrageous that the word "hussey" to describe such a woman was the result of her notoriety.  Unfortunately, the Oxford English Dictionary disagrees, noting the first use of the word in 1505 and its derivation from the Anglo Saxon "huswife".  It makes a nice story to tell the visitors, however.  The portrait is in the gallery of the West wing of the house, which was re-occupied by the family (then Lord and Lady Hastings) in the 1950s.  The present Lord Hastings subsequently sold the property to the National Trust.

comments (14)

She looks like butter wouldn't melt....Tom smile
Tom Wilson: Well, she was just a young lass at the time, Frank - she didn't discover sex until somewhat later smile
It is lovely - and so is she. I like that she has a feather in her hair.
Tom Wilson: And later, the Prince of Wales was a "feather in her cap" smile That was when she was Lady Tyrconnel and found her older husband rather lacking smile
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 13 Nov 2015, 05:00
It does make a funny anecdote, Tom.
Tom Wilson: Yes - the guides at Seaton probably still believe it smile
Lovely. Thank you for the interesting words!
Tom Wilson: A pleasure, Richard.
Some stories have the good fortune of outliving the truth, Tom. smile
Tom Wilson: And sometimes, as here, the story is better smile
  • Chris
  • England
  • 13 Nov 2015, 07:00
We usually think of a "brazen hussy" when considering outrageous behaviour. It would be wonderful to go back via a time machine to see what it actually was she did to earn her title. If she was a hussy was she brazen too?
Tom Wilson: Philine has provided this link, which explains all - http://georgianaduchessofdevonshire.blogspot.de/2009/05/tart-of-week-sarah-countess-of.html
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 13 Nov 2015, 07:15
I love this portrait - and thank you very much for two new words:
"Used to describe an attractive girl, often one that is a few years younger than ones self. Girl must be young and not particularly smart, but also flirtatious and appealing and have friends that are older guys. In this meaning, the word does not in anyway mean that the girl is a s**t or anything of that nature. If anything, it means that they are inexperienced and unguided."
Tom Wilson: Well, that's one definition smile We also use the term "brazen hussy (or hussey)" to describe someone who flaunts her hussiness without shame smile
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 13 Nov 2015, 07:22
Tom Wilson: That's the girl!
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 13 Nov 2015, 07:45
Hussey: "Refered to anything negative or pessimistic. Can be used to describe someone's action, appearance, or behavior. Commonly used by young New Englanders, mainly from southern Connecticut. Also used in place of a noun.

"Dude, stop acting all hussey."
"That's so hussey."
"Clean up and shave, man. You look like hussey."
"He's so rude and hussey."
"That car is such a hussey."
Tom Wilson: Mmm - a New England dialect term - not known in that sense in the UK
  • Lisl
  • Batheaston, Bath
  • 13 Nov 2015, 08:26
She looks as if butter wouldn't melt in her mouth, Tom - sorry, I see Frank has already said that
Tom Wilson: Isn't it always the case, Lisl smile
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 13 Nov 2015, 10:19
Not nice of the English to mix up hussies and housewives. I would therefore think that the Miss Hussey association would be a better story smile I like your presentation.

Oh, and I have read Chris and Philine's comments.
Tom Wilson: The original meaning was probably quite neutral - but, that's language for you!
Funny story about the word. Love the delicate painting.
Tom Wilson: It is rather nice, isn't it.
She looks anything but, but you never know what lurks beneath the surface.
Tom Wilson: Indeed, you never do know.
It's a very nice painting, the eyes especially.

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