tomwilson

22 Jun 2019 96 views
 
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photoblog image Hardwick Hall-5

Hardwick Hall-5

 

Portrait of Queen Elizabeth, believed to be about 1599 and "from the workshop of Nicholas Hilliard" - the famous miniaturist.  The National Trust site comments:

 

"This remarkable portrait of Elizabeth wearing a dress decorated with land and sea creatures appears to have been acquired by Elizabeth Talbot (‘Bess of Hardwick’), Countess of Shrewsbury (c. 1527 – 1608) and was almost certainly on display at Hardwick Hall in the Queen’s lifetime.

 

It concurs with others of the ‘Armada’ type, painted after 1588, in which the Queen is characterised by a rigid and hieratic expression and depicted almost as an impersonal image. It is thought that it was Bess herself who master-minded the design of the embroidery on the Queen’s dress, and possibly worked on it herself, intending it to be a spec-tacular New Year’s Day gift to the Queen. It is typical of the extravagant and sometimes bizarre late-Elizabethan style of embroidery which mixed together all manner of motifs taken from the natural world. A variety of flowers, including roses, irises and pansies, are interspersed with a lively depiction of insects, animals and fish."

Hardwick Hall-5

 

Portrait of Queen Elizabeth, believed to be about 1599 and "from the workshop of Nicholas Hilliard" - the famous miniaturist.  The National Trust site comments:

 

"This remarkable portrait of Elizabeth wearing a dress decorated with land and sea creatures appears to have been acquired by Elizabeth Talbot (‘Bess of Hardwick’), Countess of Shrewsbury (c. 1527 – 1608) and was almost certainly on display at Hardwick Hall in the Queen’s lifetime.

 

It concurs with others of the ‘Armada’ type, painted after 1588, in which the Queen is characterised by a rigid and hieratic expression and depicted almost as an impersonal image. It is thought that it was Bess herself who master-minded the design of the embroidery on the Queen’s dress, and possibly worked on it herself, intending it to be a spec-tacular New Year’s Day gift to the Queen. It is typical of the extravagant and sometimes bizarre late-Elizabethan style of embroidery which mixed together all manner of motifs taken from the natural world. A variety of flowers, including roses, irises and pansies, are interspersed with a lively depiction of insects, animals and fish."

comments (8)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 22 Jun 2019, 00:14
Here dress is like a zoo, Tom.
Tom Wilson: As the description says, Ray - anything and everything!
Ces robes devaient être très encombrantes.
Tom Wilson: C'est vrai, Martine!
Imagine having to wear something like this....well we blokes would be unlikely ever to
Tom Wilson: The doublet and hose bit was probably easier to manage!
  • Chris
  • England
  • 22 Jun 2019, 08:00
The whole overall effect is one of great detail with a touch of eccentricity to me Tom
Tom Wilson: I imagine that the discoveries being made around the world fed into the design.
i would be surprised if she could move anything else except her eyeballs and perhaps her fingers in that costume, Tom.
Tom Wilson: I guess that, as Queen, all she had to do was impress!
I am glad styles got more comfortable since then.
Tom Wilson: It's hard to think of what the Elizabethans would think of today's outfits!
A fine painting but surely the most of uncomfortable of dresses to wear, it makes one wonder, whithout being too distasteful, how she would manage to use the facilites when necessary.
Tom Wilson: There must have been some ready solution, I guess, Brian.
An incredible work of art Tom smile

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camera X-Pro2
exposure mode aperture priority
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aperture f/2.0
sensitivity ISO800
focal length 35.0mm
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