tomwilson

22 Jul 2019 115 views
 
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photoblog image Chester-weir

Chester-weir

 

An apparently insignificant feature, which turns out to be very important:

 

"Chester Weir is a weir which crosses the River Dee at Chester, Cheshire, England, slightly upstream from the Old Dee Bridge (grid reference SJ407658). The weir and the associated salmon leap are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building.

This was originally the site of a causeway across the River Dee. The weir was built in sandstone in 1093 for Hugh Lupus, 1st Earl of Chester, for the Benedictine Abbey of St Werburgh (now Chester Cathedral). It was designed to provide a head of water for the medieval mills on the river. The mills were demolished during the 20th century and the weir was restored to serve the Chester City Council's hydro-electric power station, which operated from 1913 to 1939 on the site of the former mills.

The weir continues to provide three essential roles in maintaining the very substantial water abstractions from the River Dee. It prevents tidal water ingress up-river for all but the highest tides; it provides the water head for an abstraction immediately behind the weir and it holds back what is a long linear lake which enables that largest abstraction to be taken at Huntington for the United Utilities supply to the Wirral and surrounding areas.

The weir can be navigated by crossing over the top during high spring tides. On the city-side of the weir is the United Kingdom's only example of a weirgate, a low height single lock gate that can be opened to provide extra draft once the water levels on each side of the weir have equalised. This allows carefully planned passage from the non-tidal River Dee, via the short tidal estuary section, onto the Dee Branch of the Shropshire Union Canal (originally the Chester Canal) at certain times of year." (Wikipedia)

Chester-weir

 

An apparently insignificant feature, which turns out to be very important:

 

"Chester Weir is a weir which crosses the River Dee at Chester, Cheshire, England, slightly upstream from the Old Dee Bridge (grid reference SJ407658). The weir and the associated salmon leap are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building.

This was originally the site of a causeway across the River Dee. The weir was built in sandstone in 1093 for Hugh Lupus, 1st Earl of Chester, for the Benedictine Abbey of St Werburgh (now Chester Cathedral). It was designed to provide a head of water for the medieval mills on the river. The mills were demolished during the 20th century and the weir was restored to serve the Chester City Council's hydro-electric power station, which operated from 1913 to 1939 on the site of the former mills.

The weir continues to provide three essential roles in maintaining the very substantial water abstractions from the River Dee. It prevents tidal water ingress up-river for all but the highest tides; it provides the water head for an abstraction immediately behind the weir and it holds back what is a long linear lake which enables that largest abstraction to be taken at Huntington for the United Utilities supply to the Wirral and surrounding areas.

The weir can be navigated by crossing over the top during high spring tides. On the city-side of the weir is the United Kingdom's only example of a weirgate, a low height single lock gate that can be opened to provide extra draft once the water levels on each side of the weir have equalised. This allows carefully planned passage from the non-tidal River Dee, via the short tidal estuary section, onto the Dee Branch of the Shropshire Union Canal (originally the Chester Canal) at certain times of year." (Wikipedia)

comments (10)

that was engaging text, Tom. i found it interesting that a hydro electric project was once here
Tom Wilson: Yes indeed - I don't understand why it was abandoned - it could still be very useful.
Sometimes that's the way it works.... That which appears unimportant- is most important!
Tom Wilson: True!
  • Chris
  • England
  • 22 Jul 2019, 06:41
Absolutely fascinating Tom. And I just thought this was an insignificant weir..
Tom Wilson: Exactly, I had no idea of its importance.
  • Chad
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 22 Jul 2019, 08:25
Well that is very interesting and I have never heard of a weir being listed.
Tom Wilson: A listed building that one can't even see!
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 22 Jul 2019, 10:47
It is like an automatic car wash, for the gulls.
Tom Wilson: A resting place, at least - and no doubt a bit of dubious food floats by occasionally.
How interesting, there's little, if nothing, to show how important it has been.
Tom Wilson: Absolutely - a hidden "building"
It looks a good spot for some fishing, Tom! smile
Tom Wilson: You could be right, Marting - not an activity I've ever engaged in.
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 22 Jul 2019, 21:49
Well I would never have guessed its significance.
  • sherri
  • Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
  • 23 Jul 2019, 04:56
very pretty capture and a nice background you've given us in the description
I framed a lovely card with ducks on a similar weir. I like the birds here.

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