tomwilson

20 May 2020 55 views
 
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photoblog image Rear of the pavilions - 2

Rear of the pavilions - 2

 

Looking back in the opposite direction from yesterday.  The tree in the centre is a mulberry - from which the fruit is never collected, much the pity!

Rear of the pavilions - 2

 

Looking back in the opposite direction from yesterday.  The tree in the centre is a mulberry - from which the fruit is never collected, much the pity!

comments (10)

Very nice! Why don't they collect the fruit?
Tom Wilson: I've no idea, Elizabeth - it's more surprising to me that one of the volunteers doesn't do so - it makes lovely jam!
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 20 May 2020, 04:18
The Sun is your friend, Tom.
Tom Wilson: Certainly was on that day, Ray - and it's a very fine day today, too - I may get another walk.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 20 May 2020, 05:20
Ripe mulberries are delicious, if a trifle juicy. They are the basis of the phrase "caught red handed."
Tom Wilson: They are indeed - I've had them a couple of times. I didn't know about the "red-handed" - thanks for that!
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 20 May 2020, 06:31
I just did a search to the fruit and then I saw Chris' comment. very helpful. Did you taste any ever?
What a wonderful place to walk.
Tom Wilson: Yes, I had a friend who had a mulberry tree - I think I may put one in the garden.
You could sneak in at night and pick them Tom
Tom Wilson: I could probably pick 'em during the day without anyone objecting - the problem is that most of the fruit are well above my reach - I'd need to bring in a step-ladder and that might cause comment!
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 20 May 2020, 07:36
Not often you see a mulberry tree these days, Tom. I know of one only
Tom Wilson: Apparently they were imported by James 1st - to support silk production, but he got the wrong trees. There are, it seems, quite a lot in London, and they were brought in originally by the Romans - like many other plants! This is the only one I know of locally, so I think I'll plant a bush smile
  • Chad
  • Somewhere+in+deep+space
  • 20 May 2020, 09:27
This is a grand place to visit and quite large.
Tom Wilson: 19 acres to walk around - good exercise smile
If this garden is near your home Tom then you are fortunate to have such a lovely place to visit.
Tom Wilson: About five minutes walk away, Brian.
  • Louis
  • South+Africa
  • 20 May 2020, 13:57
So next time, you take along a pot and fill it with ripe mulberries. In your kitchen, squeeze all the mulberries (maybe in a colander) to get the juice. With two cups, add one-and-a-half cup of sugar and a teaspoon of lemon juice. Bring to boil (not bubble and spurt, but a smooth rounded surface movement). Continue, while stirring intermittently, for 5 minutes. You end up with a syrup of mulberry. A few teaspoons over your vanilla ice cream. You can use it as a concentrate to mix 1:3 with water for a cold drink. It can be a mix with gin and soda water, and so on. You can very easily make a jam or a chutney out of it.

I grew up with mulberries. During spring the silk worm season started. They eat mulberry leaves - so leaves in a shoe box and worms on them. From then on it is a few fresh leaves daily, until they have spun themselves into cocoons. The cocoons are pure silk that can be harvested before the moths hatch.
Tom Wilson: Thanks for the recipe, Louis!
Mulberries are gorgeous to eat! If I visit Sheffield, I will remember this park Tom and take a stroll smile
Tom Wilson: I'll be happy to show you round, Martin - just mail me through SC.

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for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera EML-L09
exposure mode shutter priority
shutterspeed 1/2500s
aperture f/1.8
sensitivity ISO50
focal length 4.0mm
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